Welcome Autumn

table lamp, ceramic, handmade, seattle, kri kri, interior lighting

table lamp, ceramic, handmade, seattle, kri kri, interior lightingHello and Happy Autumn!

Thanks to all of you who visited the VIT ceramics booth at Dwell on Design in June!
This year, I exhibited the VIT collection in white and it was very well received. I also felt a strong response to the handmade element of VIT ceramics. Today we are surrounded by technology and super refined, highly produced, objects. Though definitely not undesirable, it seems that in response to so much tech, we are becoming more attracted to handmade objects and the beautiful irregularity inherent in artisan-crafted pieces. Dwell on design gave me the opportunity to witness, first hand, the smiles on peoples as they entered the Kri Kri Studio booth and relaxed, surrounded by handmade ceramics.

Along with introducing white to my range, I started using a vintage style, white twist cord with the VIT ceramics lamps. This carries through with the thin white stripe detail and creates a more polished product. I love the texture and the way this cord drapes!

ceramic lamp, handmade, kri kri studio, seattle, VIT ceramics, vintage cord, small details

Also New: The Bubble Lamp; Transformed with a drum shade, this small piece is ideal for bedsides, entry ways and cozy spaces!

handmade, ceramic lamp, table lamp, kri kri studio, seattle, VIT ceramics, blackhandmade, ceramic lamp, table lamp, kri kri studio, seattle, VIT ceramics, celadon

handmade, ceramic lamp, table lamp, kri kri studio, seattle, VIT ceramics, yellow

 

A busy summer has made for an exciting Autumn! I am now working on samples of lamps and vases using my new color, “Chocolate brown”. For a look at these delicious options, visit Kri Kri studio on Instagram .

Newest in the vase range is a Tall Square vase.

tall vase, handmade ceramics, square, pottery, seattle, kri kri, vit ceramics

Both elegant and quirky, this shape can stand on its own holding a bountiful bouquet. Used in pairs, the Tall Square vase creates balance and drama on mantles and sideboards. I look forward to filling  a chocolate version with fall colors!

Wishing you all a stimulating transition into the new season!

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Kristin

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Summer’s Gift

I am always on the alert for unexpected beauty and props that can be used in my photo shoots. In August it was clumps of wild fennel and rampant hot pink sweet peas that caught my attention.vase, ceramic, white, VIT, kri, krikri, Seattle

These hardy plants, plucked from the urban jungle, threaten to look more like weeds than botanical inspirations at times. However, the bright shock of pink and simple yellow-green sprays of seeds were perfect elements for highlighting my organic shapes. I utilized them over and over again.

bud, vase, white, VIT, ceramics, kri, krikri, studio, Seattle

The more time I spend photographing my work the better I come to know and understand what it is that makes them special. I see how surfaces respond to different lighting conditions. I also take note of how glaze colors interact with a variety of flowers and foliage. I grow to appreciate the irregularities of each handmade form.

cup, small, tiny, sake, ceramic, VUIT, kri, krikri, studio, seattle

This past spring I began posting images regularly on Instagram. The discipline started as a necessary task. These days posting is a satisfying activity, like making a daily journal entry. It is a time for me to slow down and take a moment to see and think about what is beautiful in my work. It is my reward for sweating over it day after day!
You can follow my photo journal: https://instagram.com/krikristudio/

2015 motto

2015, fortune cookie messageRather than make a new years resolution, it has become my custom to instead select a motto to rally me for the coming year. This one came to me just before mid-night in a fortune cookie at the New Years Eve party. I think it was the best one of the bunch and one worth sharing.

“Be yourself. No one is more qualified.” How do we do this? As an artist, this statement is particularly meaningful as far as my work is concerned. I am always trying to understand and define my own style. It is easy to get distracted by creativity all around, many ideas and so much possibility.  It is not difficult to lose focus and confidence in what one does. Part of what this year’s motto says to me is, enjoy and appreciate the work of others, but don’t under-value your own efforts. I continue to look at my ceramics to decide what the strong points are and find the essentials. Focus on the positive. Trim away the superfluous. This works for the self too. The fortune cookie message also suggests that if I define and follow my own artistic sensibilities and can be myself, I will be happier. In 2015 I am taking time to see the best of what I do and who I am, and will try to do it better. Now, that’s starting to sound like a resolution!

 

wild sweet peas

vit ceramics, set of 3, bud vases, budvases

Found roaming the wilds of Aurora Avenue in Seattle, home of Kri Kri Studio.
Vibrant magenta blossoms invade the weeds this this time of year thriving in an environment that seems to provide little assistance. Bringing them in adds life to still shots of bud vases. Must remember: I am shooting vases, not flowers. Natures beauty far surpasses my simple pieces. Yet they do have their place. Now a pink glow radiates from this cluster of vases brightening my day.

I found a table…

I found a table… under my table cloth.

Kri Kri nook set up for photo shoot
Kri Kri Studio nook set up for photo shoot

The table had been lurking around the family for years, employed as a project table for anything that involved paint, glue or in other words, anything messy. But, it just happened to be the perfect size for the nook at Kri Kri Studio. Of course, the first thing I did to it, once it was in place, was to cover it with a perky, oilcloth table cloth. And so it was for many years.

Eve vase in black in nook at Kri Kri Studio
Oilcloth covering perfect patina

Recently, I was preparing for a photo-shoot of the black Eve vase. The nook is a perfect spot. I’ve suspended a rail on the wall for hanging a back drop and hung plastic film over the windows to diffuse the light. Set up also involves ironing the back drops. In the process of all this, the perky table cloth slipped a bit more than usual and I caught a glimpse of the table below. That crusty surface, evolved from years of use was now revealed a a rich patina, perfectly rustic and so inspiring that I spent more of my day shooting than planned.

VIT ceramics bud vase set
Rustic table with modern bud vases

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Work became play as I pulled out my VIT dinnerware, then, added bud vases and vibrant fuchsia sweet peas picked in my ally.

Isn’t that how it always should be?!

VIT ceramics, bud vase with sweet peas, pear shape
pear shaped bud vases w/sweet peas

“Chocko”

VIT ceramics, lamps, chocko lamp, ceramic lamp, handmade ceramic lamp, modern, contemporary ceramics,
VIT Chocko lamp with vases

With the “Chocko” lamp base, soft geometry and a subtly dimpled surface are combine to create a functional, modern piece with a friendly appeal. The thin white stripes are raised. A simple linen shade continues the textured elements. This is the newest addition to the VIT ceramics range of lamps.

Form takes the fore front in this grouping of vases where I have let the warm gray and taupe seduce me. When the element of color is reduced, these simple shapes become elegant. The effect is calm. Filled with white flowers these handmade, contemporary vessels add gentle beauty to a home environment.

From right to left: Eve vase; 11″h x 6″w, bubble vase; 6.5″h x 6″w, round bud; 2.75″h x 3″w, torso vase; 9″h x 5″w; pear bud; 3.25″ x 2.5″w

Slow Flowers

vit ceramics, bowl vase, hydrangias
VIT ceramic bowl vase in gray with blue hydrangias

Debra Prinzing recently visited Kri Kri Studio looking for a "slow vase". She is the author of Slow Flowers: Four Seasons of Locally Grown Bouquets from the Garden, Meadow and Farm and The 50 Mile Bouquet: Seasonal, Local and Sustainable Flowers.
Read here about her new mission to establish a slow flowers network. Come to the North West Flower and Garden Show this week to see her creation in a VIT ceramic vase at the bouquet competition! Or, join Debra in a seminar.

Over the past several years, while doing media interviews and speaking to audiences about American-grown flowers, I continually heard these questions: “Where can I find American flowers?” and “How can I find florists who I trust will sell me locally-grown flowers in their designs?”
It became apparent to me that people want locally-grown, domestic flowers. But it is challenging to find American-grown flowers amidst the sea of unlabeled imported ones. It’s also hard to discover those very special, dedicated designers committed to using flowers from local farms or flowers grown in nearby states, such as during the off season.
So I’ve been inspired to launch the SLOWFLOWERS.COM online directory as a one-stop resource for consumers in search of florists who guarantee the origin of the flowers they use. In addition to florists, the site will feature studio designers, wedding and event planners, supermarket flower departments and flower farmers who are committed to American grown flowers.
It’s simple. When you contact a florist, flower shop or designer on SLOWFLOWERS.COM, they make a commitment to you, the flower consumer, that their flowers are truly homegrown.
You should be able to know the origins of the flowers you order for a loved one. You should be assured that the bouquet you carry down the aisle was grown by an American flower farmer. You should know that jobs are being created and nurtured in your community through your floral purchases.
Right now, I am raising contributions on the crowd-funding site Indiegogo to complete the web development and database for Slowflowers.com. To date, supporters of American grown flowers have pledged more than $13,500 to the project. Learn more here.
How does the site work?
• When it launches later this winter, the user-friendly directory allows consumers to search by City, State or Zip Code, coast-to-coast. You can also choose a category (Retail Florist, Studio Florist, Supermarket Floral Department, Weddings/Events, Flower CSAs or Flower Farm).
• Depending on your search categories, you will see a list of the Slow Flowers participants in the specific area of the country you seek. You will find studios and retailers who specialize in green weddings, weekly subscriptions and eco-floral design. You’ll discover local flower farms that sell direct to the DIY consumer. You will be assured that the flowers you buy are domestic in origin, grown by American flower farmers.
• When you contact a Slow Flowers vendor, be sure to tell them that you followed a link on this site – and that you plan on posting a customer review of their services.
• As the creator of Slowflowers.com, I do not take any cut or percentage fee from purchases. This site is free to flower consumers everywhere.
Debra Prinzing is a writer, speaker, outdoor living expert and leading advocate for American flower farming. She is the author of Slow Flowers: Four Seasons of Locally Grown Bouquets from the Garden, Meadow and Farm (St. Lynn’s Press, 2013) and The 50 Mile Bouquet: Seasonal, Local and Sustainable Flowers(St. Lynn’s Press, 2012).
Floral_Competition_Signs_2014_slowflowers

“Fabric”

VIT ceramics, kiln view, kri kri studio, Seattle
a view of the inside

…mulling over the word “fabric”, which means factory in Swedish and suggests fabrication in English. In English, fabric means cloth and can imply weaving. These ideas circulate in my mind as I unload my latest bisque firing. The “fabrik”, ie. the small factory that is Kri Kri Studio, is back in full gear since taking a break over the winter holidays. With just a short amount of time to fill a large order for the Seattle Art Museum’s gift shop, I have been “fabricating” everyday since I returned from the UK. Kri Kri bowls and “Smile cups” will complement the upcoming Miro exhibit which opens there in February. Also in the works are vases for shops thinking ahead to spring and a push to finish all the heart plates so that they will be ready ship and to serve up some love on Valentine’s Day.

The more I think about it, the more it reminds me of the year I spent weaving in Sweden. By varying colors and shifting shapes, I am weaving together the seasons with ceramics. Over the course of the year a textured tapestry of wares is fabricated. Images of food and fashion inspire me as I flip through magazines on my lunch break, munching my salad and feasting on fantasy. I ponder over which glazes will make particular dishes most appetizing. I think that photo shoot in Cuba has precisely the mood I would like to capture. Is it just that particular shade of yellow which gives it that feeling? Then, the factory calls me back to repeat the production cycle. I am stimulated to continue approaching my work with enthusiasm for process and to be creative. It’s OK. I love it. This is my passion!