Paris in the spring

VIT ceramics, bud vase, French blue, Paris, Terra Bella Flowers

Can’t make it to Paris this spring? Option 2: Invite spring into your home instead with fresh flowers!

Like fresh flowers, new colors announce “Spring is here”. In Seattle the forsythia has nearly run its course. Now its flowering cherry trees that are exploding into soft pink clouds. In the studio familiar vase shapes are emerging from the kiln in a lovely rich pastel blue.
Not only does this new color do a fantastic job as a stand alone shade, it injects fresh energy to the palette of standard VIT colors. When combined with red and gray the look is sporty and very French.

VIT creamics, bud vases, red, gray, blue, kri kri studio
Sporty combo

Replace gray with yellow and renew your love of primary classics.

Bud vase, primary colors, creamic, kri kri studio
VIT bud vase cluster in primary colors

 

Pairing the new blue with jade green evokes either a tropical water vibe or the gentle calm of a forest floor. The colors are clean. Very “spring”.

VIT ceramics, bubble vase, blue green vase, daffodils, kri kri studio, Seattle
Bubble vases with daffodils

Release your own Spring energies: clip, combine, create!

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original objects

vit ceramic, bubble vase, kri kri studio
handmade VIT ceramic bubble vase in taupe and red

It’s about the light, capturing it and bringing it into your space. It’s about the branch, bringing life. It’s also about original objects giving authenticity. Not much is needed to add these elements to ones living space. But what a difference it can make!

One can usually sense foliage that is artificial, and the feel in a room is different when fresh flowers are in a vase. Likewise, an original object possesses life that a machine-made one doesn’t. Objects made by hand retain energy of the of human that made them and give some of that back when we place them in our environment. Having artisan made things, and art, in my home inspires me toward perfection, but gently reminds me that there is beauty in the struggle to do ones best. As well as marveling at a skillfully¬†handcrafted item, I relish its imperfections. Perfection may never be reached, but along the way there are so many wonderful discoveries to be made. My accumulated objects remind me of the winding path I have been on to the present me. Most often it is those made by hand that revive best and nudge me to keep on climbing.

Evolution

VIT ceramic vase, handmade, modern, taupe, kri kri studio, Seattle
VIT Eve vase with lilies

The evolution of the vase range has been organic, with one thing leading to another very naturally. I knew that I needed a larger vase and had been mulling over some shape ideas in my head for sometime. Then, along came “Grammie’s urn” project. That took my thoughts away from a just a vessel for flowers to a shape that required a more intimate involvement. Developing the urn made a fine launching pad for this vase. As mentioned in my last post, I considered Grammie’s femininity and incorporated that into the design. Nipping the vase in at the waist, in an¬† allusion to the female figure, allows the shape to support the flowers. With a classic full bouquet, this could be seen as a warm, overflowing bosom. Is there anything so welcoming as a bountiful floral arrangement?! Like the idealized woman, my new vase is also accommodating. Take pleasure in highlighting the qualities of a few large blossoms. Look forward to spring when this vase can host a bunch of inky blue irises.

Now that summer has passed, casting and drying a ceramic piece takes a lot longer. Then, there is the process of glazing and firing. One by one, as they gradually come out of the mold, I try the vase in a new VIT color. It is always delightful to see a new shape in another color for the first time. Much in the same way that it is a pleasure to see a good friend dressed up in a new outfit, one sees the piece differently and can appreciate another facet of its beauty.

Each piece needs a name and this vase vase will get a one special one. I will call it “Eve”, after Evelyn Nelson Hildebrand, for my own indulgence. But, most will be able to identify the name with the feminine form which inspired it.